Visiting

MUSEUM CLOSURE - MONDAY 8TH JUNE
Over the course of the summer there will be scaffolding surrounding the Museum entrance, we will be closed for one day while this is put up, on Monday 8th June, but open thereafter.


IMPORTANT ACCESS INFORMATION

We will shortly be closing our lift to the public while it undergoes essential maintenance. During this time we cannot offer lift access to the Museum. Official notice will be posted here once this takes place. We apologise for any inconvenience.

Admission is FREE to the Sedgwick Museum for all visitors.

Opening Times

Monday to Friday: 10am–1pm, 2pm–5pm

Saturday
: 10am – 4pm

Sunday
: CLOSED

The Museum is closed on some bank holidays, these are: Good Friday, Christmas Day, Boxing Day and New Years Day. 
2015 UPDATE: The Museum will be open on the following dates: Saturday 4th April, Monday 6th April, Monday 4th May, Monday 25th May, Monday 31st August

We are also closed over the Christmas period, the dates for 2014/15 are: 24th December - 12th January.


The main entrance to the Museum

Where is the Sedgwick Museum?


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To assist you in planning your visit to the Museum, a copy of the Gallery Plan is available in PDF format (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader) via the link below.
Download the Gallery Plan


 


May 22, 2015

A weird group of ancient but surviving carnivorous worms, known as priapulids, which live in burrows on the seabed, evolved a remarkable method of capturing their prey – they can turn their hook-lined throat region inside out through the mouth to form a very effective grappling iron for capturing their prey.


May 19, 2015

The possibility that the extinction of the dinosaurs 66 million years ago may have been caused by the eruption of the Deccan lavas in India has been increased by new research, published in the Geological Society of America Bulletin (doi:10.1130/B31167.1).


A view of the Mahabaleshwar escarpment in the western Ghats, India. Just a small part of the 3.6 km thick pile of lavas that flooded over the Deccan region of India some 66 million years ago? (photo copyright Dr Sally Gibson, Dept. Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge)