• Museum entrance
  • Downing Street view of Museum
  • Museum steps
  • Tower
  • Museum gallery

Travel through time…

The Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences is the oldest of the University of Cambridge museums, having been established in 1728 as the Woodwardian Museum. Since then the collection has grown from about 10,000 fossils, minerals and rocks, to at least 2 million. A walk through the museum will take you on a 4.5 billion year journey through time, from the meteoritic building blocks of planets, to the thousands of fossils of animals and plants that illustrate the evolution of life in the oceans, on land and in the air. Also a major teaching and research resource in the Department of Earth Sciences, the Sedgwick Museum collections are a national treasure.


School Bookings Visiting
- The Museum will be closed on Good Friday but open on Easter Monday 2015
- The Sedgwick has a new addition to the family - meet Clare the T-Rex! Read her story here


Earth Stories - The latest geological news Collections Up Close


Monday to Friday
10:00 to 13:00 & 14:00 to 17:00

Saturday
10:00 to 16:00 

Sunday
CLOSED





Six months after she trundled through Cambridge following a late night at her Namesake College’s May Ball, Clare the Tyrannosaurus rex has finally moved to her new home. The half-size metal sculpture is now a permanent feature outside the entrance to the Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences.




As part of the Museum's new exciting project arising from the recent award from Arts Council England Designation Development Fund, a project conservator, Rachel Howie, has been working on some of the Museum's most prized specimens with the aim of enhancing digital access to these special objects.



Studying Earth Sciences at Cambridge University

Discover more about studying Earth Sciences at the University of Cambridge in this video featuring Museum Curator of Mineralogy and Petrology Professor Marian Holness and Sir David Attenborough