Conservation Research

Current research that involves the Museum conservator and conservation lab

The conservation laboratory is involved with a research group studying Early Carboniferous Tetrapods from the Scottish Borders. These animals are characterised by having four limbs and represent some of the earliest fully terrestrial vertebrates. The laboratory is preparing some of these recently discovered unique fossils. Analysis of the mineral composition of the rock that some of the fossils are preserved in has been carried out in the Department of Earth Sciences, using X-Ray Diffraction. Here you can see a plot showing the mineral composition of one of the specimens. We are interested in this because it will tell us if there any minerals in the rock that could begin to alter and change if the fossil is kept in an unstable environment.

       
   
Graph                                                                                       Photo of tetropod skull

You can read more about the project here:http://tetrapods.org



Monday to Friday
10:00 to 13:00 & 14:00 to 17:00

Saturday
10:00 to 16:00

Sunday
Closed 



Mar 9, 2015

Last weekend the Museum was turned pink and played host to the launch of Pink Week 2015. Pink Week is a week of events aimed at raising funds and awareness for breast cancer charities. Inspired by the activism of the late Dina Rabinovitch, Pink Week ran for the first time in Haberdashers’ Aske’s school in 2011. Since then, Pink Week has gone from strength to strength, launching at Clare College, Cambridge in 2014.



Mar 5, 2015

An international team of researchers, including members from the Department of Earth Sciences here in Cambridge, have used an X-ray microscope to investigate meteorite samples from the Sedgwick Museum to learn about the earliest stages of the evolution of the solar system.