Location

The Sedgwick Museum is located in the centre of town in Cambridge on the Downing Site of the University of Cambridge.

Travelling to Cambridge

Cambridge is easily accessed by road, and is just under one hour by train from London. Frequent coach services link the city with London, Oxford and towns across East Anglia.

Getting to the Museum

Once in the city, we encourage our visitors to make use of the Cambridge Park and Ride facilities. If you wish to park in town, the Grand Arcade car park is the closest car park to the Museum. Please be aware however that parking in Cambridge can be very expensive.

Free accessible parking is available for visitors with disabilities in the Department of Earth Sciences car park whose entrance is on Tennis Court Road. Visitors must have a blue badge and it is essential to contact us prior to your visit to ensure that we can accommodate your request. For more information please visit our dedicated Access webpage.


View Larger Map

Explore the area around the Museum using Google Street View. The actual entrance to the Museum is through the archway (shown on Street View) and to the left.

Monday to Friday
10:00 to 13:00 & 14:00 to 17:00

Saturday
10:00 to 16:00 

Sunday
Closed



This summer, young visitors to some of our UCM museums have the opportunity to participate in an exciting artist-led treasure hunt. Hidden Tales: the Riddle of the White Sphinx, created by Mark Wells and Sorrel May, and illustrated by Jennifer Bell encourages families to explore our museums in a different way... Author Mark Wells tells all here.



Fifty years ago, Cambridge mineralogist, Dr Stuart Agrell was given VIP treatment and a police escort after flying into Heathrow from the USA because he was carrying a bag full of very precious rock material. The samples were amongst the most expensive ever collected as they had been retrieved from the moon by two of the American Apollo 11 mission astronauts. The programme of their investigation was a remarkable and unprecedented example of international scientific collaboration, which still continues.

Stuart Agrell on the underground with a carpet bag of rocks from the Apollo 11 missionGuess what I’ve got in my bag? 50 years ago, Cambridge mineralogist, Stuart Agrell nonchalantly carried some of the most valuable rocks ever collected back to Cambridge in his holdall. (© Mirrorpix, reproduced with permission)