Loans

Loans of Museum specimens are available for scientific research and exhibitions, subject to the Museum’s Loans Out Policy.
Anyone wishing to borrow specimens must sign an Outgoing Loan Agreement, which must be returned to the Museum before a loan can be made.
For exhibition loans you will also be required to supply a Facilities Report detailing the environmental and security conditions of your exhibition space.

When requesting a loan please supply us with the following information:

  • Details of the required object(s), including the object number and brief description.
  • Name, address and contact details of borrower.
  • Name and status of individual making request.
  • Purpose of loan and, if intended for exhibition, the scope of the exhibition and details of all venues.
  • Proposed dates of the loan.
  • A brief statement of the indemnity or insurance provisions which will be made.

General conditions of loan: Download here

Objects not available for loan:

We will endeavour to meet your request if at all possible, but not all of our specimens are currently available for loan. As we continue retrospective documentation we hope to make more of our collections available in the future. We apologise for any inconvenience caused if the object(s) you request cannot be loaned at this time.

Type fossils

Type fossils will not normally be loaned out. To arrange a research visit to study our type collections please contact us. Further information about our type collections, including many photographs and 3D digital models can be found here.

To request a loan or for further information please contact us.




Monday to Friday
10:00 to 13:00 & 14:00 to 17:00

Saturday
10:00 to 16:00 

Sunday
CLOSED



May 22, 2015

A weird group of ancient but surviving carnivorous worms, known as priapulids, which live in burrows on the seabed, evolved a remarkable method of capturing their prey – they can turn their hook-lined throat region inside out through the mouth to form a very effective grappling iron for capturing their prey.


May 19, 2015

The possibility that the extinction of the dinosaurs 66 million years ago may have been caused by the eruption of the Deccan lavas in India has been increased by new research, published in the Geological Society of America Bulletin (doi:10.1130/B31167.1).