Can you find all of our Dinosaurs?

For more than 160 million years, dinosaurs ruled the Earth. More than 800 species are known, but it is likely there were many more. We have a number of representatives from this lost world on display in the gallery ...

IguanodonIguandodon foot
Found in the Cretaceous rocks of South-East England, this herbivore probably lived in herds and was common in lowland areas across Europe. A complete Iguanodon skeleton welcomes you as you enter  the museum.

T.rexT.rex skull
T.rex lived at the very end of the Cretaceous Period. It was a meat-eating dinosaur, one of the largest to have ever lived. The Museums T.rex skull is a resin replica of a fossil nicknamed Stan, after Stan Sacrison who discovered it. Doncaster artist Ian Curran made the T.rex sculpture that stands outside the Museum.

Compsognathus 
CompsognathusAt 70 cm (28 inches) in length, Compsognathus is one of the smallest known dinosaurs. The long tail helped it balance when running. On display is a fossil and a life-sized model of this tiny predator.

megalosaurusMegalosaurus 
This Jurassic giant had teeth like steak-knives and sharp, hooked claws. At 8 m (26 feet) in length, an adult Megalosaurus was about the same size as a bus. The skull on display was found in Oxfordshire.

Deinonychus Deinonychus
This 'terrible claw' was a light and agile predator from the Cretaceous. It had sharp, hooked claws that could rotate into the flesh of their prey.

HypsilophodonHypsilophodon
This small herbivore had teeth and sharp beak used for nipping off leaves and shoots. It was also an extremely fast runner.  It lived in the early Cretaceous Period and was found on the Isle of Wight.

Allosaurus skullAllosaurus
Almost as big as a T.rex, Allosaurus lived in the late Jurassic Period. It ate the large plant-eating sauropods and stegosaurs of the time, and had a jaw filled with long, serrated, back-curving teeth.

ArchaeopteryxArchaeopteryx
The Museums Archaeopteryx is a replica of a slab now in the Berlin Museum of Natural History. It is the most complete specimen found so far. It lived in the late Jurassic Period and was the size of a raven.

Gorgosaurus
This tyrannosaurid dinosaur lived in western North America during the Late GorgosaurusCretaceous Period. Its name means dreadful lizard, and with adults weighing in at more than two metric tons and with dozens of large, sharp teeth in its jaws, it certainly lived up to its name.

Temporarily closed due to Covid-19
The government recently announced that museums and galleries will be able to re-open from 4 July. Here at the Sedgwick, we are really looking forward to welcoming you back, and are working hard to put in place plans to make sure visitors, staff and volunteers will be safe.  We anticipate that we will reopen later in the summer, and will involve a free, timed, ticketing system. We keep you informed of our plans via our website and social media. 
In the meantime, we are delighted that the Cambridge University Botanic Garden has already reopened 
https://www.botanic.cam.ac.uk/
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