Family activites

Activity Boxes 
Choose from nine different activity boxes to use in the gallery. Just ask in the shop

Find our Dinosaurs! 
Can you find all of the museums dinosaurs?

Visit our book trolley
There are a selection of books to choose from about themes explored in the Museum, from dinosaurs to earthquakes and fossilised poo!

Puzzles
Build up the layers of Jurassic marine reptiles from their skeletons to their skins, discover the inner workings of the famous HMS Beagle and construct an ammonite with our in-gallery puzzles.

Poetry Board
Use our collections to inspire your own poetic masterpiece using our magnetic poetry board.

Colouring
Get creative at one of our two colouring stations. Pick up a colouring sheet and choose from dinosaurs to prehistoric animals.

Trails
The Museum has a selection of free trails - pick one up at the front desk to explore the Museum.

Online resources
If you can't make it in to the Museum why not explore our online interactives.

 

 

Monday to Friday
10:00 to 13:00 & 14:00 to 17:00

Saturday
10:00 to 16:00 

Sunday
Closed



This summer, young visitors to some of our UCM museums have the opportunity to participate in an exciting artist-led treasure hunt. Hidden Tales: the Riddle of the White Sphinx, created by Mark Wells and Sorrel May, and illustrated by Jennifer Bell encourages families to explore our museums in a different way... Author Mark Wells tells all here.



Fifty years ago, Cambridge mineralogist, Dr Stuart Agrell was given VIP treatment and a police escort after flying into Heathrow from the USA because he was carrying a bag full of very precious rock material. The samples were amongst the most expensive ever collected as they had been retrieved from the moon by two of the American Apollo 11 mission astronauts. The programme of their investigation was a remarkable and unprecedented example of international scientific collaboration, which still continues.

Stuart Agrell on the underground with a carpet bag of rocks from the Apollo 11 missionGuess what I’ve got in my bag? 50 years ago, Cambridge mineralogist, Stuart Agrell nonchalantly carried some of the most valuable rocks ever collected back to Cambridge in his holdall. (© Mirrorpix, reproduced with permission)