Facilities

Toilets

The Sedgwick has one toilet within the Museum. An accessible toilet is available within the Department of Earth Sciences on the ground floor. Museum staff will provide access to this upon request.

Baby changing

Both the toilet within the Museum and the accessible toilet 
within the Department of Earth Sciences have baby changing facilities.

Food and Drink

The Museum does not have a café or restaurant. Museum staff will be happy to recommend local restaurants and cafés for visitors to use. The consumption of food and drink in Museum galleries is strictly forbidden.


Left luggage/Cloakroom

Coat hooks are available for visitors to leave their possessions at the front entrance of the Museum. Please note that this is strictly at visitors own risk and the Museum accepts no responsibility for lost or stolen items. The Museum is unable to store personal items in any offices or behind the front desk due to security regulations.



Photography and filming

We allow photography including with flash within the Museum galleries but no filming.

Lost property

The Museum holds lost property in the main Museum office for a period of one month. Items are recorded on the day that they are found. Thereafter items are donated to charity. If you think you have lost something during your visit to the Museum please contact the Museum Administrator as soon as possible.

 



Monday to Friday
10:00 to 13:00 & 14:00 to 17:00

Saturday
10:00 to 16:00

Sunday
Closed 



Mar 9, 2015

Last weekend the Museum was turned pink and played host to the launch of Pink Week 2015. Pink Week is a week of events aimed at raising funds and awareness for breast cancer charities. Inspired by the activism of the late Dina Rabinovitch, Pink Week ran for the first time in Haberdashers’ Aske’s school in 2011. Since then, Pink Week has gone from strength to strength, launching at Clare College, Cambridge in 2014.



Mar 5, 2015

An international team of researchers, including members from the Department of Earth Sciences here in Cambridge, have used an X-ray microscope to investigate meteorite samples from the Sedgwick Museum to learn about the earliest stages of the evolution of the solar system.