Making a Donation to the Sedgwick Museum

**SPECIAL NOTICE**
Our Rocks are on the Move!
We are reuniting our important rock collections under one roof! Can you help support the building of our new Sedgwick Museum Collections store? Read more and donate here
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By making a donation you can help to support the Museum and the work that the staff do. Donations are crucial to allow us to make improvements to the facilities and displays within the museum as well as supporting key staff and behind the scenes work.

You can make a donation to the Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences online (using a credit or debit card), in person or by post. 

Click here to donate online.

When you click on the link above, you will be transferred to the secure online giving facility hosted by the University of Cambridge's Development Office, where you will be asked to enter your gift amount and payment details.

If you would like to make a donation in person we have a donations box in the entrance area of the museum, outside the information point and shop area.

If you would like to make a donation by post please send a cheque made payable to the University of Cambridge and address this to:

Museum Administrator
Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences,
Department of Earth Sciences,
The University of Cambridge,
Downing Street,
Cambridge,
CB2 3EQ

Thank you for your donation and for supporting the work of the Sedgwick Museum.

For any other enquiries about making a donation to the museum please contact us.




Monday to Friday
10:00 to 13:00 & 14:00 to 17:00

Saturday
10:00 to 16:00 

Sunday
CLOSED
 


Nov 16, 2018

W.B.R. King was awarded the Military Cross for bravery with the British Expeditionary Force before being evacuated from Dunkirk in 1940. He was a Cambridge graduate and World War I veteran who pioneered the use of geological expertise in the theatre of war. King went on to become the 11th Woodwardian professor of geology in 1944.



Nov 14, 2018

The recent discovery of Ice Age mammoth and rhino remains near Cambridge became national news. By coincidence, the Sedgwick Museum at the University of Cambridge has a new exhibit which tells the story of late Ice Age times and how the life and environments of Cambridgeshire were dramatically altered by climate change.