Collections

 

A printable PDF ‘Guide to the Archive collections’ is available here. This is updated annually.

Archive records include:

  • Papers, correspondence, and original manuscript catalogues relating to the historical specimen collections in the Museum and its stores. These include catalogues written by Dr John Woodward (1665-1728), whose collections of fossils were bequeathed to the University after his death.
  • The papers of those who helped establish the Sedgwick Museum and/or were curators and directors. These include:
                       o Thomas McKenny Hughes (1833-1917)
                       o Albert ‘Bertie’ Brighton (1901-1988)
                       o Stuart Olof Agrell (1913-1996)
                       o Richard Barrie Rickards (1938-2009)
  • The laboratory and field notebooks, papers and correspondence of geologists, petrologists, palaeontologists and mineralogists. These include:

                       o William Hallowes Miller (1801-1880)
                       o Thomas Bonney (1833-1923)
                       o John Marr (1857-1933)
                       o Alfred Harker (1859-1939)
                       o William Macfadyen (1893-1985)
                       o William Alexander Deer (1910-2009)

Please see Access to Records for more information about visiting the archive and getting in touch with us for further information.



How do you get thirty-six 8-11yr olds excited about science in museums? Give them a ‘crime scene’ and skills to solve the crime.



Sir John Franklin’s ill-fated expedition to the North-West Passage has often been in the news ever since he left England on the 19th May, 1845 never to return. Successive searches throughout the 19th century eventually found artefacts and human remains. But it was not until 2014 the wreck of Franklin’s ship, HMS Erebus was found and two years later the wreck of HMS Terror. Now the extraordinary story of HMS Erebus is receiving new publicity thanks to the publication of Michael Palin’s new book – ‘Erebus : the story of a ship’. Whilst the earliest searches did not find any traces of Franklin and his crew, one of them, led by Captain Kellett did find a superb mammoth tusk, which is now part of the Sedgwick Museum’s Ice Age display.