Sedgwick Activity Boxes

It’s easy! Just ask at the shop for the boxes you want. You will need to leave either keys or a credit card as a deposit whilst you use them. When you’re done, make sure everything goes back in the right box and return it to get your deposit item back.

What Colour Were Dinosaurs?
How do we know what colour dinosaurs were? Find out how palaeontologists work it out with this matching activity. 
Suggested for ages 6+ 
Time for activity: 15 minutes 

My, What Big Teeth You Have 
Are all your teeth the same? Find out how we know what dinosaurs ate by looking at their teeth.
Suggested for ages 2 – 7yrs 
Time for activity: 15 minutes

When Did Dinosaurs Live?
Search the galleries to find out about the depths of geological time with this activity.
Suggested for ages 6+ 
Time for activity: 15 minutes

Gigantosaurus 
All young diosaurs are warned about the Gigantosaurus. Based on the book by Jonny Duddle.
Ages: 2 - 5yrs Time: 15 minutes

Fur, Feathers or Scales?
Find out how palaeontologists work out what dinosaurs were wearing on top of their skeletons with this matching activity. 
Suited for ages 4 – 8yrs 
Time for activity: 15 minutes

Mystery Minerals 
Be a detective and find out what is really in this box of mystery minerals!
Suggested for ages 6+ 
Time for activity: 15minutes 

Dinosaur Trails
What is the biggest step you can take? Do you think it is as big as a dinosaur’s step? Find out with this activity.
Suggested for ages 2 – 7yrs 
Time for activity: 15 minutes 

Prehistoric Footprints
Find out about some of Cambridge's Ice Age animals. What can fossils tell us about past climates?
Ages: 2 - 7yrs Time: 10 minutes


Monday to Friday
10:00 to 13:00 & 14:00 to 17:00

Saturday
10:00 to 16:00 

Sunday
Closed



How do you get thirty-six 8-11yr olds excited about science in museums? Give them a ‘crime scene’ and skills to solve the crime.



Sir John Franklin’s ill-fated expedition to the North-West Passage has often been in the news ever since he left England on the 19th May, 1845 never to return. Successive searches throughout the 19th century eventually found artefacts and human remains. But it was not until 2014 the wreck of Franklin’s ship, HMS Erebus was found and two years later the wreck of HMS Terror. Now the extraordinary story of HMS Erebus is receiving new publicity thanks to the publication of Michael Palin’s new book – ‘Erebus : the story of a ship’. Whilst the earliest searches did not find any traces of Franklin and his crew, one of them, led by Captain Kellett did find a superb mammoth tusk, which is now part of the Sedgwick Museum’s Ice Age display.